Kadletz

living sea build

Recommended Posts

Kadletz   

So new development on living sea,i was diving it today and i found lawnmower blenny sitting on eggs. any thoughts to this do, you think they will live, or any other advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
scootman   

this is cool. AnOldSalt may have some ideas here, but I'm clueless. I'd suggest you invest in Matthew Wittenrich's book and perhaps Dr. Moe's book.

Scoots

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DrHank   

I don't know either but considering the volume of the system, if they are going to hatch, they have a better chance there than in a small tank. I tend to doubt that any fry would survive at this time because the system is too new. If the base rock was all live rock (hopefully 5 years down the road, Id' think that chances would be much better.

I do think it's great that the blenny laid eggs. That should say something about your water chemistry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think once the system balances out and does its final cycling and the sandbed clears and it starts to develop with new critters and pods that it maybe possible to rear them in the LS. But only once the sandbed and rock have had time to develop as Jim has mentioned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the living sea is developing quite nicely. I've been helping Chris plant coral I suppose you could say ;) Lets just say everything looks real happy :) Including some new fish and sand shifting conchs and snails ;)

I hope everyone can see it again in six months. It will be totally changed and have an awesome feel I envision.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
scootman   

Chris,

Is the ultimate purpose, of the Living Sea display, to use it as a fish breeding and culturing vessel or is it going to be a coral farm? You'll grow corals much more successfully. I've been reading several books, and chatting with a couple of their authors (via internet), about captive breeding of marine fish. I think you'll have a lot of fish spawning, but I don't think you'll have a lot of success with raising the fry. You have the perfect facility for mating yellow tangs, but they're pelagics...so the eggs will just drift freely. Unless you create a way to skim out those eggs and tend to them...they'll eventually become caviar. The good news is that all those fish eggs and larvae will make great plankton for the rest of the system. I wish I lived closer to the Gulfarium, because I'd swing by often to see the development of that system. You have an awesome opportunity with that tank.

Scoots

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I have little to add to what's already been said.

As the Living Sea matures, you should see a lot more spawning, and so much in fact that you won't even consider it noteworthy. Eventually you should start getting some surviviors, but not, as mentioned already, until those would-be survivors have something to eat.

Once you get a bunch of good Acropora and other coral shelves going, you'll have some good places for the larvae to settle out for metamorphosis.

You will lose the vast majority of your fry to your massive skimmer, of course, and to the other fish, but hey, these things spawn by the hundreds and even thousands, so you'll get some fish out of it. You could always try to manually remove some larvae occasionally and try to grow them out in small tanks.

I spawned a lot of fish there when I was there, ( including cleaner wrasses!!! ) but I never had a system like the current ones available. ( of course, I condemn the use of cleaner wrasses in any tank. They were just there already when I got there and I was stuck with them. Of the 14 specimens purchased, only two survived a few months, and they made it a couple of years at least )

I can also tell you that a mature, well worn tank that is almost dirty will give you a lot more spawns than a pristinely clean one. Have you ever been to a saltwater fish farm? You'd be amazed at how filthy the tanks look, but you can't argue with the results. Once the L.S. gets broken in right & proper, you'll have "smoother" water that is less "raw" and which makes the fish feel more at ease. The trick, of course, is keeping your nitrate down at the same time, but you should be able to do that okay if you don't overfeed.

Honestly, I would try to figure out a way to incorporate the mother of all algae filters into this system. THEN you'd see some results! Hooboy...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How is the waste water being processed? Where is it dumping? Sorry, I forgot. Dumping into the Gulf may cause environmental problems with parasites and larve getting free. No one expected the lionfish to survive Florida waters and look what has happened with them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nitrates are still zero last time I checked (last week). The water is pristine but a small outbreak of Cyanobacteria is going on but it shouldn't last long especially with the rate we have been fanning it off of the rocks. The skimmer has been doing an excellent job of carrying these nasties out. If you look at the skimmate you'll know how much Cyano it really does pull out, especially while we are fanning it off of the rocks.

I'm sure a lot of the fish that are in there will want to spawn with that many places to set a spawning site up at. But as Trey (AnOldSalt) has mentioned, that huge RK2 skimmer is going to be gobbling a few million of the free floating fertile eggs. So there might be a few survivors...but I wouldn't expect to see the next ORA Fish Farm operation over here. :)

I can't wait to see this place on a full moon dive. I imagine once everything adjusts to being placed in the aquarium that a lot of the animals will spawn. Corals, Clams, Fish, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heather,

This is something that was taken care of a long time ago when the Gulfarium first opened. A lot of their draining goes directly to the water sewage plant, while a few raw water drains enter the Gulf, but the water comes only from native species tanks. Such as Bottle Nose Dolphins and other waste waters that don't pose a threat to the environment.

The Living Sea is a closed system. With occasional water changes being performed with raw water. The waste water goes to the sewer system and from there I can't tell where it goes ;)

This kind of question isn't something you should have to worry about with all the rules, laws and regulations, a professional organization such as the Gulfarium is looking out for the environment as well as trying to follow all local rules and regulations. By all means they do go through inspections to ensure their facility is running up to par and legal. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kadletz   

thanks for all the comments and questions guys. And thank you jared for helping me answer them. One thing i would like to add is the size of all the corals polyps they much larger then i have ever seen in any of the smaller tanks. all of the acro's are doing very very well. one monti i placed is already growing to a rock. not sure but i like what i see.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DrHank   

Your system is probably very stable due to the size. Once you get things right (which they seem to be) they will tend to stay that way or change very slowly. I'd say just maintain routine testing and remember that any change that will happen gradually in that volume of water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you will watch the slide show on the home page you will see pictures of it in the back ground, though I have heard they have been adding even more as of late. It is a public aquarium, there is an entry fee but I think locals get a discount on Sundays.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kadletz   

many of my rics in L.S. have started budding. if any of you have some corals that you would like me to prop out plz bring by.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow,

That is something else. I thought that it might be a tank that was in the back of the building or something. I can't wait to see it.

No one expected the lionfish to survive Florida waters and look what has happened with them.

Where are they? Around our waters or down around the keys?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Lionfish?

They are everywhere now, from Miami to Newark. They are very efficient spawners, it would seem, with no significant natural enemies in the atlantic. It's getting so bad in places that you can see a half-dozen or more adults perched atop every rockpile you see in some areas. Lots of people have been stung so far, but almost all of them were people hunting them anyway, so that's to be expected.

There is a massive extermination effort in progress , though, but it looks like it's gonna be a long, hard slog to be rid of them.

We REALLY did not need this right now, either. Fishkeeping has many enemies, and their latest effort to shut us all down, in the form of a new bill called H.R.6311, will likely succeed this time, effectively outlawing freshwater fishkeeping without explicitly stating that as it's intent. Sneaky. At least Saltwater was safe, or so it seemed, but the sensational reporting of the lionfish problem lately will certainly have an impact on the saltwater side as well.

Lions aren't in the Gulf of Mexico yet, as far as I know. They got caught up in the Gulf Stream in the Atlantic, which quickly pushed them all up the Atlantic coastline, well away from the Gulf side. This happens all the time with various native marine tropical fishes, but they don't survive the winter. Lions, however, CAN survive the winter. Who knew?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Actually, lionfish have been seen off Tampa. They think they have started breeding.

I don't think that they "think" but that they know. The lionfish population is way too high for them not to be. I will have to see if I can find the time to dig out the noaa article it was interesting. I saw a pic somewhere of a guy with a stringer full of them. They were asking anybody who saw one to remove it from the water any way they can(safely)and report where it was captured.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now