Humblefish

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Everything posted by Humblefish

  1. Hydrogen Peroxide *** The information contained here is subject to frequent changes as I experiment and learn more about the usefulness of H2O2 *** What It Treats – Provides temporary relief for Marine Velvet Disease. After a 30 minute H2O2 bath, the fish should be transferred into a Quarantine Tank (QT) and treated with either copper or Chloroquine phosphate. How To Treat – The following is needed: 1. 3% Hydrogen Peroxide (USP grade) - available at most drugstores or Walmart 2. Large glass bowl or container (Avoid using plastic buckets/containers) 3. Syringe or pipette (for measuring out the H2O2) and measuring cup (for adding saltwater to the glass bowl) 4. Metal spoon for mixing (NOT plastic) Directions: 1. Prepare saltwater for the bath by having it set to the right temperature and heavily aerating it. You can accomplish the latter by running an airstone or pointing a powerhead towards the surface of the water for at least 1 hour (longer is better). Alternatively, you can use Display Tank (DT) water or even from your Quarantine Tank (QT) provided no medications/chemicals are present in the water. 2. Add saltwater (using measuring cup) to the large glass bowl. Keep track of exactly how much water is added - either in cups or ml. (Do this beforehand if preparing saltwater for the bath right in the glass bowl.) Make sure your fish has enough water to swim around and last for 30 minutes without aeration. 3. Discontinue all aeration before adding Hydrogen Peroxide to the water. Using a syringe or pipette, add 3% Hydrogen Peroxide as per dosing instructions below. Dip the tip below the waterline and spread the H2O2 throughout the water. (Do not allow any air/bubbles to enter the water at this point.) After dosing is complete, gently stir the water using a metal spoon. The reason you want to be careful not to create any gas exchange/aeration once the H2O2 has been added is to prevent the atoms from releasing their bond and becoming just oxygen + water. Dosing instructions: To achieve ~ 75ppm H2O2 add: 1.25 ml of 3% H2O2 per 2 cups of saltwater. It's okay to overdose slightly. OR 2.5 ml of 3% H2O2 per 1 liter of saltwater. It's okay to overdose slightly. 4. Now it's time to add the fish. Again, do not aerate during treatment. The bath water should be perfectly still. It's okay to use a heater, but probably not necessary since the bath only lasts 30 minutes. Observe closely and remove the fish if showing signs of distress. The vast majority of fish will handle it just fine. After 30 minutes, remove the fish and transfer into a QT for further treatment: https://humble.fish/velvet/ Pros – Effective, easy-to-source “pre-treatment” before fish is placed in QT with copper or Chloroquine. In this study, a single 30 minute treatment with 75 ppm hydrogen peroxide "greatly reduced" Velvet trophonts on the fish: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/230234979_The_Application_of_Hydrogen_Peroxide_as_a_Treatment_for_the_Ectoparasite_Amyloodinium_ocellatum_Brown_1931_on_the_Pacific_Threadfin_Polydactylus_sexfilis Cons/Side Effects – Still experimental so side effects are not really known. It's possible some fish may not tolerate this treatment. *** Further reading on use of Hydrogen Peroxide for fish: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fa157 (PDF: https://agrilifecdn.tamu.edu/fisheries/files/2013/09/Use-of-Hydrogen-Peroxide-in-Finfish-Aquaculture.pdf) http://www.masa.asn.au/masawiki/index.php/Hydrogen_Peroxide http://www.masa.asn.au/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?t=212442 More info from the aforementioned study: https://www.academia.edu/23793309/The_Application_of_Hydrogen_Peroxide_as_a_Treatment_for_the_Ectoparasite_Amyloodinium_ocellatum_Brown_1931_on_the_Pacific_Threadfin_Polydactylus_sexfilis
  2. Free fish

    Fish rehomed. Admins/mods please close.
  3. Free fish

    1 - Yellowtail Damsel 1 - Ocellaris Clownfish Both free to a good home! I'm located in Navarre
  4. Salt mixing poorly

    Every now and then I'll get a bag of hard salt, and clumps of it won't completely mix. I primarily use Instant Ocean. The best salt I have ever used is Oceanic (hard to find). Mixes quickly, no brown residue, excellent trace elements, and I still have a bucket from years ago that I use for my wife's small office tank that has never clumped up.
  5. Salt mixing poorly

    Which brand of salt?
  6. Quarantined fish for sale

    Sorry, forgot to update this. All sold except for the Bluespot Goby $15.
  7. Quarantined fish for sale

    Got some stragglers I need to sell. I've had most of these fish 6+ months, they are fully quarantined and survived a pretty virulent bacterial infection; so I only want them going to people with disease-free DTs. Purple Tang $175 Hippo Tang $60 Helfrichi Firefish $90 GIANT Bluespot Goby (DO NOT house with small fish) $15 Pair of Black Onyx Clownfish $100
  8. Quarantined fish for sale

    ^^ Price drop on the Bluespot Goby $20 Also open to offers on the clownfish and Helfrichi.
  9. We've all seen claims of ich, velvet, etc. returning after a 76 day fallow period. (For anyone wondering what a fallow period means click here: https://www.reef2reef.com/threads/fallow-periods-going-fishless.190324/) Oftentimes, a fallow period failure is due to human error: The sick fish weren't treated long enough or the treatment itself wasn't done properly, cross contamination via wet hands or equipment, aerosol transmission (more info). It is also possible that undiscovered strains of ich (and other diseases) exist; ones with a prolonged life cycle that exceeds what we know to be true from scientific research. However, there is also this possibility to consider: Dormancy induced by a hypoxic environment in tomonts of Cryptocaryon irritans, a parasitic ciliate of marine teleosts Highlights from the study: This study demonstrates that tomonts of Cryptocaryon irritans become dormant in hypoxic environments. Dormant tomonts resume development in oxic environments at any developmental stages. We examined tomont viability following variable sequences of oxic and hypoxic conditions. Dormancy in hypoxic environments may be key to the autumn outbreaks of cryptocaryoniasis in floating net cages in temperate waters. So what does this mean for us and our fallow aquariums? Primarily, the study showed that an ich tomont (the "egg stage" which encysts to corals, inverts, rocks, etc.) can go dormant if the protomont crawls into a hypoxic (low oxygen) environment or anaerobic (no oxygen) region of your DT just before encysting. Examples of this include under your sand bed (especially a DSB), inside a non-porous rock, any "no flow" region of a canister or other aquarium filter. The study also demonstrated that once returned to an oxygen rich environment, these once dormant tomonts resumed their development and released theronts (free swimmers which seek out fish to infect.) How long can it take for a dormant tomont in a hypoxic environment to suddenly be exposed to an oxic (oxygen rich) environment? The world may never know?! So what can you do to eliminate low oxygen areas of your DT during a fallow period? Take any canister or enclosed filters offline, and sterilize them with bleach. Without fish to foul the water, your DT will be fine with just rock/sand for filtration and good water circulation. Speaking of circulation, crank up those pumps for maximum flow & gas exchange throughout the aquarium. (Don't forget to add a pump down in the sump.) Blow out your rocks (using a powerhead) and vacuum the sand during water changes whilst going fallow. This will "stir things up" and provide free oxygen to those areas. How can I setup my Display Tank to be "hypoxic proof" just in case I ever have to go fallow? Only use filtration with an open top (like a sump), and avoid canister filters and other filters which may contain anaerobic regions. If needed, take these offline if ever having to go fallow. Use just a light layer of sand; the deeper it is the more likely tomonts can get "trapped" down under there. Never have sand out of reach (i.e. under a rock) in case you need to vacuum it during a fallow period. Only use very porous rock which will allow plenty of flow (and oxygen) to pass through. More information on Marine Ich (Cryptocaryon irritans) can be found here: https://www.reef2reef.com/threads/ich-cryptocaryon-irritans.191226/
  10. Quarantined fish for sale

    Pic of the Bluespot Goby:
  11. Quarantined fish for sale

    Both tangs sold. Firefish, goby + clownfish pair remain.
  12. Quarantined fish for sale

  13. Quarantined fish for sale

  14. FREE 3 Yellowtail Damsels

    Rehomed to a LFS. Please close.
  15. FREE 3 Yellowtail Damsels

    They're mean little SOBs, but the upside is they've gone thru QT. Need them gone in the next few days, or they go to a LFS. Located in Navarre, but willing to travel as far as FWB or Gulf Breeze in order to rehome them.
  16. FREE 3 Yellowtail Damsels

    Still available!
  17. Small tanks for sale

    I have some excess small tanks I need to sell: 10 gal = $10 20 Tall = $20 20 Long = $20 29 gal = $30 40 breeder = $40 All are Aqueon brand and like new. Tank only. Located in Navarre.
  18. DK Reef Treasures

    Finally got a chance to swing by this LFS today. Lots of corals, good prices, I picked up a couple of nice hammer frags. They also had a beautiful Pintail Fairy Wrasse for only $100 (I already have one). That is a crazy good price for such a nice wrasse! I highly recommend checking this place out!
  19. Wth or trade for a zebrasoma tang

    You’d probably have better luck with a Foxface, or Tech M Is known to contain an impurity which usually eradicates bryopsis. Worked for me just a few months back.
  20. WTB: 55 gal w/stand

    Got what I needed. This thread can be closed.
  21. WTB: 55 gal w/stand

    Looking for a standard 55 gallon tank (48x12x20) and stand. Don't need anything else, just the tank & stand. This will primarily be used as a holding/observation tank, so the stand doesn't have to be pretty and the tank just needs to hold water.
  22. SB's first Sunday...... October

    Looking forward to it!
  23. Bleaching liverock

    Bleach will eventually 100% evaporate, only leaving a salt-like residue (harmless) behind. If you wanted to pull it out of the rock quicker... soak it in RODI, run a circulation pump and use some sodium thiosulfate to neutralize the chlorine. Chlor Out (available at most pool supply places) contains sodium thiosulfate and is safe to use: https://sunplay.com/products/haviland-chlor-out-chlorine-neutralizer
  24. Aquarium equipment yard sale 9/15

    What size tanks/stands?
  25. WTB: 55 gal w/stand

    PMs sent