mgarden

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About mgarden

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  • Birthday January 1

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  • Location
    Panama City, FL
  • Interests
    Aquaculture, SCUBA

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  1. Seahorse or bangaii breeder.

    I am glad to hear you wouldn't release them! If you were successful you could try donating them to Gulf World or the park in Fort Walton but they wont take to many. We did raise them to maturity or close enough, some we had for 6-7 months. We delivered from Mobile, AL to Tallahassee. It has been several years since we had seahorses. The most recent was clowns several types and cardinal fish and got out of that about 2 years ago or so. We also tried the dwarf seahorses, although the male appeared pregnant a few times, we never were able to catch the fry, too small. In all cases we had difficulty selling our fish (with the exception of cardinal fish). I can go on and on about the trials and difficulties with this. Once you become successful, you can be overwhelmed with the quantity of fish. The difficulty became too much supply and not enough demand. Our market here is very small and our fish were very hardy. Culling fish is weird now a days. There was a time when any mis-bared fish were culled. For culling, you could give them to someone who has a preditor tank, freeze them, have a tank for your misfits which was what we did. Breeding of these mis-bars was discouraged. But now many of the "designer" fish would have been considered for culling. Large facilities can take these oddities and can quickly have a new "type" of clown morph. The mocha is really a mix of Darwin (black and whites) and a perc. I personally wouldn't turn those to market but now they are Mocha's, demanding more than the typical perc. We didn't cull any seahorses there was no need to we just held on to them, replaced any that didn't survive the store tank water even if it were a few weeks from delivery.
  2. WTB macro algae for seahorse

    you can use some old sea fan from a shell store. The blade type calupera (porlifera) is what I would recommend - looks like "seaweed" and grows well under regular fluorescent lighting. It does go to seed but not as regular as grape calupera. Purne it, grows in runners so it is easy to do. https://www.live-plants.com/prolifera.htm
  3. Seahorse or bangaii breeder.

    We raised seahorses for years. They do become like clowns with regular births. They are really interesting to watch. Make sure there is some open space in the front of the tank. They will swim back and forth several times, trumpeting and then hitch tails and travel to the top of the tank. You will need a tall tank in order for the transfer to be successful. I would also recommend a species only tank as they are very prone to infections (vibro). A pair will work in a 15 gallon tall, I would not put 2 pairs in that tank if you used a 40 tall that would work fine. Watch out for anemones and some stinging corals as these can burn their flesh. Keeping the tank on the cool side will help with bacterial control. Hatching brine is a breeze but you need to sort the shells. Also you can keep the brine in a container for a couple of days as long as you feed them. Use instant algae. Then like Moat said you slowly make the transition using both frozen and live feet to all frozen. Cleaning the tank is also important, again with infections or dirty tank. For the first few weeks you can house a batch in a 5-10 gallon tank. If they are erectus they will hitch right away. Other species require circulation for a few days before they hitch. Expect to get hundreds of fry. YES hundreds. Then the trick is to send them to market... be prepared to hold them for a few months. I would also recommend feeding some live ghost shrimp to the adults. Although most do eat frozen a few ghost shrimp a couple of times a month does them good. You see them acting like they do in nature. Good luck, as with captive culturing this is well worth the effort as you will be one of the few lucky enough to witness this wonder live!
  4. Water Storage

    I've always worried about chemicals leaching from trash cans especially over time. I don't know if that was a real or imagined problem. I used pickle barrels with lids. I stored 40 to 50 gallons of water.
  5. 2/14 Met A New Girl On Valentines Day

    Well I guess you don't know how to tell the difference in sexes on sharks. Picture 2 shows claspers - which indicates a male shark. I don't know if you are a catch and release guy but stressing any kind of animal out should be considered cruelty. How would you like to be held underwater and not being able to breath just to have someone take your picture? Sport - nonscense - a hungry animal will always go after food. Try using no bait - that would be sporting and you wouldn't have a chance.
  6. Fotw - Green Clown Goby (Gobiodon Histrio)

    I have been enjoying these write ups. Great job. We have kept these guys for several years. Funny little fish. We purchased and kept 2 in a 30 gallon tank. They did not change sexes, but we don't have any acros. One lived onto of a leather and the other lived at the other end in some mushrooms. They ate very well and we had them for about 3 -4 years until we let them go to someone.
  7. We have kept both pygmy and "regular" sized seahorses. You will need a separate tank to house these also feeding requirements are newly hatched bbs. Like all seahorses they are prone to getting diseases so you want a species only tank - no corals as these tiny tikes will get stung easily and don't do well with much current. We kept ours with a sponge filter and regular water changes. You can use a hang on filter but put some netting around the base and restrict the flow to the lowest possible setting. Macro algae gives the tank a great look, keep it pruned back so that you can see the seahorses. 10 gallon tank with sand bottom and regular fluorescent lighting. keep monitoring water parameters until you figure out how much water you have to change weekly, maybe a gallon or so. With a smaller tank and regular fluorescent lighting you shouldn't have to worry about temperature. Seahorses in general - we were successful in keeping them for around 8 years. We had breeding success too. Ours did not do well in a warm tank (above 82 degrees). They are very prone to infections vibrio (I don't remember how to spell it). Keeping the tank cool was one way to help control the bacteria. They can get problems with gas bubble disease, snout problems and infections. If you purchase from local stores make sure they will eat frozen foods. I have seen some in stores that I think the horses would only be able to eat live bbs or live brine and don't look to be old enough to take in frozen Mysis. Have them prove they will eat Mysis. Again low flow tank (not good for corals) and very timid eaters so if you house them with aggressive eaters they may not get enough food. Algae eating blennies will try to eat the algae that somethimes accumulates on their backs so don't house with algae eating blennies. If you want them to show their natural mating behavior make sure that there is some open space in the front with a clear path so that they can parade back and forth in the morning and evenings. They will "trumpet" and tangle their tails together. A regular size tank would be fine but the depth may not be high enough for them to ascend to the surface entangled. I like a 15 tall or 40 tall. You can house a pair nicely in the 15 tall. Fluorescent lights are fine for the macro algae growth and doesn't add a lot of heat to the tank. Dan U at seahorse source has some great ponies. Very knowledgeable and answers questions on the seahorse.org forum. They are awesome! Where there is a will, there is a way....
  8. Breeding Clown Fish

    I have 4 sets of black and whites, 3 pairs GSM, 2 pairs true percs, 1 pair saddle back, 1 pair tomatos - all regular layers. My 2 pair of trues are actually one "onyx" paired with a "normal" true - I tried to develop a larger back margin in the center of the fish to make them distinctively more true and also get some onyx. Most designers are just a variant of an Osc that the breeder kept because of a different pattern. Historically these designer fish would have been considered culls and disposed of. Now people pay big bucks for them. Large facilities have the opportunity to collect more weird pattern fish due to the volume of fish produced. Keep the weird ones, grow them out, pair them off and raise the fry, keep the weird ones and continue to get further and further away from the "normal". Since each generation would take about a year to produce another generation, those you are seeing today were probably started 3 years ago if not more. No designer clowns for me, although I do like the snow flakes. One pair of 16 year old clarki which still lay on a regular basis. Yes 16 years... Everything I have read says that older clowns wouldn't be good breeders. These fish are still regular, although I haven't rasied clarki in 4 years, no market for them. Kevin - where is your friend located,? Just curious. I have heard that there is a breeder in Pensacola, but no one has confirmed this to me. I am very interested in other peoples breeding systems especially small breeders. Does he do any other species? I will try to post pics over the weekend. I'm not great at loading the photos and get frustrated sometimes... younger folks have no trouble but me it is time consuming.
  9. Breeding Clown Fish

    We get our nano (algae) and rots from Reed Mariculture. As Mydrall said - Its time consuming and a lot of trial and error. It took us a couple of months to get 10 fish but once you get it down it can go like clockwork. Best thing about it - You raised clownfish and a lot of people try, not many succeed. Biggest challenge - getting rid of fish once you are successful, no matter how nice they are, eventually you have supplied the local market. You may end up holding fish for several months. Holding fish (electricity, filter media, heating, lighting), feeding them and doing water changes add up month to month. If anyone is interested in breeding pairs (black & whites, true percs, tomatos, GSM or saddle backs) and or purchasing our set up give me a shout.
  10. Bagnai Cardinal Breeding

    Oh for the other part of the question. It is a challenge to get a pair. There is a way to tell with the jaw line of the male fish but its difficult to notice when the fish are young and it is very very slight flair. Most of the time if you see them in the store and there are 2 that really hang out together they may be a pair, but not guaranteed. The other option is buy 6 or 8 raise them up and you should get a pair maybe 2. Sell/trade the adult fish to someone or back to the store if funds aren't a problem. Batches of fry are small 15 - 20 fish or so. Easily managed for a while in a 5 - 10 gallon tank. Good Luck its really interesting and rewarding.
  11. Bagnai Cardinal Breeding

    We have bred them. We usually let the male release the fry and then catch the fry. If you catch the male too early he will release eggs and we haven't been successful in hatching out the eggs without a tumbler. When transferring fry from parent tank to grow out important to use parent tank water and then slowly change that water over time. Don't use "new" water. Food - use enriched newly hatched bbs. Hatch it yourself daily enrich with selcon, selco the fish oil stuff and feed the bbs some algae - can use instant algae or stuff you grow yourself. If you don't enrich foods you will get a significant die off. Also these fish are very prone to getting startled and may die when you clean the tank. Don't use big movements and use an airline hose. Easy to raise once you get your system down but there are some learning hurdles. Nice that you have a pair!
  12. Outside Tank

    We do use a chiller. The piping going inside the shed is for the chiller. We haven't had temperatures over 85. The area where the tank is located in not in direct sunlight and is shaded a good portion of the afternoon. We don't or haven't needed shade cloth either. This time of year it is the most challenging. We turn the chiller off. At night we plug in tank heaters and the whole area is covered with clear polyethylene walls that we can roll up and down. Up in the day and down at night. We add a space heater under the tank and the poly traps a lot of that heat in. In November/December we cover the whole area again with one of those blue tarps, we cover the tank with Styrofoam from coolers and we have the heaters going a good portion of the day. We have had temps dip into the 60s but not for an extended period of time. When I find the photos of the foam around the tank and the blue tarp I will post them.
  13. Outside Tank

    Started this tank about 1.5 years ago. This will be our second winter. We have softies and some LPSs. A pair of B & W, pair of True Pers and a GSM and some macro algae.
  14. I don't have experience with gobies but because they are mouth brooders, you should be able to feed the newly hatched fish newly hatched brine shrimp. I would recommend that you collect the fry as soon as you notice them hatch and place them in a small 5 -10 gallon tank with 100% parent tank water. Feed newly hatched brine shrimp 3 to 4 times a day. You will need to vacuum out waste 2x per day and replace with 50-50 mix of parent water and new saltwater to keep nitrates low. I would love to help, but I'm in Panama City. What kind of gobies? Did you buy them as a pair? Very interested. You can post some questions on MarineBreeder.org in the gobies section. Keep notes of what works and what hasn't. It may be time intensive but well worth the knowledge you gain! Good Luck.
  15. I went to the store yesterday and they have a ton of nice corals. Softies and hard corals. They appeared to be healthy. They guys said they are getting even more corals shortly.